“IT WAS SNIPERS”

Irene and Clarence Stine Photograph by Nancy Camden

Irene and Clarence Stine Photograph by Nancy Camden

I headed to a small town simply because the name, Ladysmith, Wisconsin, intrigued me. I ended up recording a glimpse of the guarded memories of a WWII vet who had been wounded in the jungle of New Guinea, one year to the day after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. When I sat down at ninety-four-year-old Clarence Stine’s kitchen table, I had no idea what this quiet man was about to share. Clarence’s wife, Irene, had always wanted the story to be recorded. (Listen between the sentences to what is not shared, to what it must have been like for the 21 year old.) I was led to the Stines by a chance meeting at a military veteran’s mural that had just been installed a few days before I happened to drive down that street in Ladysmith, Wisconsin.   (Click the words in blue to see photographs of the mural by artist Kelly Meredith. Clarence Stine’s great, great niece Neveaha Wicke stands under the image of Clarence in his uniform.)